The Conference on Mental Readiness: Strategies for Psychological Health & Safety in Police Organizations

February 17-19, 2015

The mental health and safety of those who work in police organizations is a high priority of the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police (CACP).  

During the March 2014 conference, Balancing Individual Safety, Community Safety and Life Quality – A Conference to Improve Interactions for Persons with Mental Illness, the mental health and safety of those working in police organizations emerged as an important theme.

To further the important discussions at the March 2014 Conference and building on the successful partnership between the MHCC and the CACP, the partners have committed to conducting a conference dedicated to this topic in February of 2015. 


 

Who Should Attend:

  • Police Leaders, Policy Makers and Governing Officials
  • Police Personnel and Police Association/Union Representatives 
  • Police Human Resource Practitioners
  • Mental Health Practitioners and Policy Makers
  • Police and Mental Health Educators 
  • Police and Mental Health Researchers
  • Members of the police community who have lived experience of mental health problems and mental illnesses (including current and former employees of police organizations, their families, and advocates)

For more information or to register for the conference, click here

 


Balancing Individual Safety, Community Safety and Quality of Life

A conference to improve interactions with persons with mental illness

On March 24 and 25, 2014, more than 300 people gathered in Toronto to share perspectives and experiences about mental illness and the justice system – representatives from police, health care, law, research and education and people with lived experience of mental illness, their families, and advocates.

The conference has concluded, but the conversation about policing and mental health continues. Conference highlights include the need for better, more consistent training and education for police officers to improve interactions with people with mental illness, as well as the need to safeguard the psychological health of police on the job. The MHCC was pleased to partner with the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police to present the conference, and looks forward to ongoing collaboration.

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